Scotland's Bid for Independence

No, but she still hasn’t been able to achieve an overall majority.

She leads the largest political party in Scotland though? And is the one who is trying to get us away from London rule…even now she is requesting a meeting with Boris Johnston about action on the cost of living, and he is dragging his feet.

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If you think there is a direct comparison between being one member country within the EU and being under direct control from Westminster then you really do not understand either. They are not the same or even equivalent. Only someone who does not understand both concepts would make that statement.

Well I do think you do have to live here…that’s the idea. No point in voting for the independence of a country you don’t stay in, is there?

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Hi

II am English, but can think of nothing better than not being under the control of Westminster.

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Come on up here then laddie, I’m sure we can squeeze you in somewhere!

UK Parliamentary elections

"All British, Republic of Ireland and qualifying Commonwealth citizens meet the nationality requirement to register to vote in UK Parliamentary elections.1

Local government elections

British citizens, citizens from the European Union and qualifying Commonwealth citizens all meet the nationality requirement to register to vote in local government elections."

This isn’t just an “election” though, Scotland isn’t electing anyone, or anything. This is a referendum surrounding Scotland’s right to become independent. So its right and proper that such a vote should be from the people who reside in Scotland.

Thanks for sharing that. I was so surprised that your post stated that EU citizens (who have registered to vote) can vote in the local government elections that I went and checked. I should not have doubted your post. It is there clearly on the gov.uk web site. I’m surprised as post-Brexit I know that in most EU countries they do not allow UK citizens who are resident there to vote in any election. Not even for the local mayor of their village. The UK decision to allow non-UK citizens a vote in local elections is very interesting.

This is a referendum about Scotland’s Independence. Not an election. We aren’t electing anyone.

Of course it is about a referendum and you are correct to keep the chat on topic. However the relevance to voting in elections is about who qualifies to vote for elections and in referendums. It seems strange to me that I, as a Scot living in France, could vote in the Brexit referendum, could not vote in the Scottish independence referendum but can vote in UK general elections. I think that is very relevant to this thread.
(I will happily park the chat about UK / France local election voting - that was merely an item of interest to me.)

On this occasion, I was simply pointing out the difference between an election and a referendum, as I did to Ted. To vote in the Scottish referendum, you need to be resident in Scotland, which is different from being able to vote in an election.

Yes, I understand your point. But do you not consider it inconsistent that UK citizens resident overseas could vote in the Brexit referendum but people who are Scottish by birth but no longer live in Scotland can’t vote in an independence referendum? At the same time, citizens of other countries residing in Scotland at the time of a referendum, even temporarily living there, can vote. Would it not be reasonable to give all Scottish people a say in the future of Scotland?

No.

If you live in Scotland, you get to decide.

If you choose to live elsewhere, then you don’t get a say.

I understand what the rules were for the last independence referendum. I am simply noting that in living elsewhere, perhaps even just over the border in Carlisle or in New Zealand, you do not stop being Scottish by birth. And you may likely return to Scotland. And once Scotland gains independence you might be first in the queue to get a Scottish passport (and happily bin the UK one). For all these reasons, as well as the principle established in the Brexit referendum on who could vote, is it not reasonable to give all first generation Scots a say in a future independence referendum?

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Yes a different thing altogether. The Scottish elections only get a fairly low turnout of around 55-60% whereas the 2014 referendum had a 84.5% turnout. Result 55.3 against 44.7 for. This extra turnout is where the SNP miscalculated and makes it uncertain next time.

Not if they don’t live here, no. You’d need to ask Nicola Sturgeon that question, but I wouldn’t give a vote to someone who chose to live in New Zealand and may or may not return. What has Scotland being Independent got to do with them now?

Ok, you’ve demonstrated tons of openness and willingness to consider this issue.
What it has got to do with me is that I very much would like a Scottish passport should independence happen. I would qualify for such a passport as I am Scottish by birth. Given that it seems inconsistent that I cannot vote on this issue. I would contend that it has as much relevance to me as it does to some office worker posted from London to Edinburgh for a couple of years. No need to reply. Your position is clear. It would be interesting to hear other’s views though.

Erm…you do realise that forums are for the purposes of discussion, don’t you?

Yes of course I do. Discussion and exchange of views. If you want to add a new thought or suggestion please do.