Everything New in Windows 10’s May 2019 Update

Windows 10’s latest update is the May 2019 Update, which is version 1903 and was codenamed 19H1 during development. It features a light theme, speed improvements, and lots of polish. There are no crazy new features like My People or Timeline. And it’s out now.

Microsoft previously called this Windows 10’s April 2019 Update, but it was delayed. The stable update began rolling out on May 21, 2019 and became available to everyone as of June 6, 2019.

There are a lot of changes/improvements - I’ve just finished reading through them before I update my laptop … :shock:

Hi Omah :slight_smile: I am happy with my laptop as it is , I don’t want any 'improvements '. The last lot crashed my laptop by freezing all my extentions :shock:.

My laptop is on metered time now now so there isn’t enough time to download long updates :mrgreen: Windows is not pleased about that and sends me bossy messages :lol:

I would recommend NOT updating yet anyway (until the bugs are located and dealt with). However, in the new release:

Big Changes to Windows Update

Microsoft announced it’s making big changes to the way Windows 10 updates. You’ll have much more control over the way Windows 10 installs updates—or not.

Specifically, Windows 10 will no longer automatically install big updates like the May 2019 Update and October 2018 Update every six months without your permission. Now, you’ll see a notification and it’s your choice when you want to install the update.

Don’t want to install the update? That’s fine. You can keep using your current version of Windows 10 for as long as it’s supported with security updates—that’s 18 months after release. But, once every 18 months, you will be forced to update to keep getting security fixes. This is much better than once every six months, and it gives you a lot more control.

On top of that, Microsoft will now let Home users pause updates—just as Professional users can—for up to 35 days. You must pause in seven day periods, but you can pause up to five times. And, after you check for updates in Windows Update, Windows won’t automatically install them—you’ll have a choice to pause the updates, if you like.

Somebody at MS has been listening … :slight_smile:

The last Win10 update completely knackered my installation of Office 2016 Professional. I had to repair it by re-installing it from the Windows website and putting in my user licence in order to use it again.

Bring back win7 I say. Win10 was just a way of stopping people using Office for nothing.

Update completed OK - 3 hours for download and install - 30 minutes for PC updates and restarts.

I don’t have MS Office on my laptop so I can’t test it.

Three hours for an update? Help ma boab, you could install it from scratch in that time.

For the first hour or so, the download may stick at 99% … :069:

B******s!

I got the update a couple of weeks ago by going to to the Microsoft site and downloading the Update Assistant tool. I didn’t time the download of the files or the installation time but I don’t think it took that long. Perhaps just depends on connection and computer speeds.

Why not tell it to do it at night when you are asleep? They warned me a big upgrade was about to happen and asked when would be convenient.

Personally I haven’t had any problems with WIN10 thus far at all. I run it on two laptops and a desktop and they all up grade automatically (I do run M$ Office). I spent a little while turning off all the M$ things I didn’t like but apart from that I am very happy with Win10.

I should say that I do run Classic Shell so it looks like Win7 however I notice that it has been taken over by Git-Hub as Open Shell and presumably is now open source.

I haven’t done it but don’t you have to restart and click on certain buttons and all that sort of rubbish? :lol:

Was it worth it Mart? Has it turned Win10 into a stable OS?

No, does it all by itself restarts and all when I get up in the morning it smugly tells me what is new (or something like that)

I’ve found it to be a stable OS anyway LD. I haven’t noticed very much difference between the previous version (1809) and the May update version (1903) personally, although there are all the changes listed in the page linked to by Omah. Maybe it just depends on how the computer is used as to what differences will be noticed.

One annoyance the update has cleared up for me is that Xara Designer (a program I use) now opens very quickly. I could wait for up to a minute for that to open. I thought it was the program itself but the Windows update seems to have sorted it out.

I see. Knowing Microsoft, it has probably been rummaging through your cupboards during the night to see what food you have in. :wink:

I think it needs updating to make it a usable system, I know I am new to it but I hate it so far.

Thanks for the info though, I suppose what I have, couldn’t be much worse so I might try the update at some point.

I know I’ve mentioned Linux before. I use it for some of my computer time. Certainly good enough for using the Internet, e-mail, music, photo editing and other stuff. Some programs don’t have Linux versions but there are often good equivalents available. Maybe you’ll get used to W.!0 in time but if that doesn’t happen, Linux is pretty good these days.

You should know by now that ANYTHING can affect download/installation time … :wink:

As I mentioned, some downloads have been known to stick at 99% - mine did … :shock:

Additionally, in my case the laptop is 8 years old and the internet connection speed is is via the 2.4 GHz band … :frowning:

Now that I’ve timed the Update on my laptop I’ll be prepared to allocate “spare” time on my (younger) desktop … :slight_smile:

Because I have worked with computers for 50 years and I know that if you “leave” a computer performing an upgrade/update it may well develop a problem. The last thing I want is to wake up to find that the upgrade/update failed 10 minutes after I went to bed … :frowning:

For me, far more satisfactory to peform the upgrade/update at a time when I am able to check (and time) its’ progress, requirements and (preferably) success … :023: